3 Partner Yoga Poses to Try with Your Friends & Family

In this post, I’ll break down three partner yoga poses you can try with your friends and family this holiday week!

Partner yoga is so fun because you get to share the experience with someone else. I am definitely that person at a family party or friendsgiving talking about the benefits of yoga and/or inviting everyone to come to class. 🙂 I remember at one family party, my brother’s girlfriend and I tried a partner yoga pose (it was one where she got into high plank on the floor facing one way and I stacked my plank on top of hers facing the other way) in the living room just for fun!

The great thing is you don’t need to be an advanced yogi to try these. Alright, let’s go!

Headstand x Dancer’s Pose

This pose connects headstand and dancer’s pose. Before you start, check out my?headstand tutorial here.

So step one, one of you get into headstand (for more advanced yogis, you can try it with handstand or one-legged wheel pose). The partner that will do dancer’s pose should capture both of your ankles to stabilize both of you.

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Once you both feel stable with your foundation, your partner will start to remove one hand away and take his/her palm and capture the inside arch of her foot or ankle. Make sure this partner’s shoulder opens outward and the eye of her elbow faces out to protect her shoulder.

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For you in headstand, keep your breath steady and core engaged. For you in dancer’s, kick your foot back into your palm to lift your leg higher. Find one steady point that isn’t moving to focus your gaze on. Hold the pose as long as you’d like and?slowly release.

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Balance out right and left and take turns being the headstand partner!

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Handstand x Legs up the Wall Pose

This is a really fun way to practice your handstand with some help! Have one partner get into legs up the wall. This partner gets to chill for a bit! Stand in front of your partner about one leg’s distance but facing away. Then go into forward fold, on an inhale lift your spine halfway and then plant your palms shoulder width distance apart. Try to have your wrist creases parallel in one line. Lift your right leg as if you were going into standing splits, then connect that foot to your partner’s. Then lift your left leg to connect your other foot. Now you’re in handstand!

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Your hands will be pretty far forward at first, so hug your lower core in and wrap your front ribs in, then walk your hands back slowly closer to your partner. As you do this, keep pressing your feet into your partner’s to help you get your hips stacked over your shoulders.

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The best part? You get to jump off! Take turns being the handstand partner.

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Locust or Bow x Legs up the Wall Pose

This one is really fun and requires some bravery and lots of trust and communication! One of you go into legs up the wall. Have your partner stand in front of you then interlace your hands with hers. Bend your knees then place your feet in a V position on her hips. The trick here is your toes should be right around her hip bones for a stable foundation. Grip your partner’s hips with your toes.

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Bend your knees a lot and stabilize your hips.?Ask your partner to lean her weight into your feet. Use your hands to draw her closer to parallel to the ground. At this point, she is balancing on top of your feet.

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Then here’s the trick, once your hips are stable, imagine yourself at the leg press machine and press out through your legs. For the flying partner, engage your spine and core as you balance and be fearless here! The next important trick for you is to use your toes. Imagine you are playing piano on their hips with your toes; this will really help you balance!

Once you both feel confident and stable, start to release your hands.

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Then you can?play?with resting your arms on the ground and the flying partner can go into floor bow pose.

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Then gently release your partner and take turns being the flyer!

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As you can see, we had so much fun playing with these poses! Hope you do too and let me know in the comments below!

My partner is MariAngel?and we are both wearing Monday Active?via?Bandier.?Photos by Alex Jay.

??Bianca

3 Tips for When You Only Have 5 Minutes to Practice Yoga

In this post, I’ll be sharing 3 practices that are useful for days when you only have five minutes to do yoga.

I got up early Monday morning to take a C2 class at CorePower Yoga before work. The room was heated to 98 degrees and it felt so good because if you know me, you know I’m always cold. Brrr. I started moving through the first poses of class and all I could think of was wow, I am so so tight. Then, I tried to think back to the last time I made it to a yoga class and realized that it had been a week. During the week, I usually practice on my own at home or the gym but nothing beats going into a yoga studio and leaving all distractions at the door. If you’ve been practicing yoga, you’ll notice that your body feels so much better with regular practice. I’ve noticed that I’m a lot less reactive and generally more relaxed when I can make it to my mat more consistently. That’s when I thought to myself, I really need to set aside time to practice yoga every single day, even for just 5 minutes.

So here are my three tips!

Practice Your Breath

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Here’s a breathing exercise that will help you relax.

Close your eyes.

Inhale through your nose to the slow count of four ? 1-2-3-4.

Breathe in as much air as you can and once you reach 4, hold your breath for 4 counts ??1-2-3-4.

Exhale through your nose to the slow count of four ? 4-3-2-1.

Repeat this 3 to 4 times or until you feel more calm and relaxed.

Practice Your Flow

The physical part of your practice does not need to be 60 minutes long for it to be a complete one. Maybe you decide to put your phone away for 15 minutes, roll out your mat, and just move to your breath. I think a little bit each day is better than nothing! Maybe your yoga for the day is just taking some shoulder and neck rolls while sitting at your desk at work. That is perfect!

This week, I was feeling a lot of tension in my shoulders so it felt good to stretch out that area. Here’s a 3 minute flow that encourages shoulder mobility. Think of areas where you feel the most tension or tightness and practice some poses that target that area.

Practice Your Gratitude

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I’ve had to constantly go back to gratitude this week. How about you? It’s easy to get overwhelmed, especially during this time of year with the holidays coming up. When you start to notice feelings of discontentment, anxiety, or any other feeling that is not serving you, start to think of things you are thankful for. Start with the most basic things and keep going from there. Gratitude will reframe your thoughts and your day.

I hope these three tips were helpful and thank you for reading!

Share with me?one thing you are grateful for in the comments below.

??Bianca

How To Get into Headstand

Yoga with Bianca | Supported?Headstand

Supported headstand is one of the first inversions I learned when I got deeper into my yoga practice. I remember practicing the pose at home and usually by a wall. Then one day, I was in a yoga class and my mat was in the middle of the room. The instructor cued us through the pose by piking up our legs and I found the lift up and held the pose! I was so excited! It wasn’t until I learned to use core stability to pike up did this pose really click for me. In this post, I will show you how to get into headstand in a safe and accessible way.

Just to preface this tutorial, everyone’s body structure is different. Our muscles, joints, and bones are built differently and any injuries will also change the dynamic. If you experience any neck or shoulder injuries, I would refrain from spending time in headstand and opting for other inversions instead.

Here we go!

With any yoga pose you are attempting, you can use the following template to break down the pose:

Breaking Down Supported Headstand- SOUL

S-?Strengthen

Core, Shoulders

O-?Open

Shoulders

U-?Understand Muscle Action

Extension of hamstring muscles and core stabilization

L- Lengthen

Hamstrings

(Source of acronym:?Corepower Yoga?Level II Teacher Training)

Build-up Poses

Yoga Sequence

Before you go into headstand practice, I recommend flowing through sun salutations and a strength series for your core. You can practice the poses and vinyasa flow shown here, which will help warm up your body for this peak posture. You can incorporate the poses below in?your own flow.

Child’s Pose Variation

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This is a modification for child’s pose that opens up your triceps. I love starting in child’s pose because it is so grounding. This pose opens up your hips and shoulders. Try bringing your knees to mat distance or wider and bringing your big toes to touch. You can massage your forehead side to side to ease away tension. This is the perfect transition from your busy day into your yoga practice.

?Three-Legged Dog

three-legged-dogGround your palms into the mat in downward facing dog. Focus on pressing your knuckles down into the mat so you alleviate the pressure from your wrists. Stay in downward facing dog for a few breaths. Lift your leg up in space while keeping equal pressure on both palms and squaring your hips in line with one another. Keep breathing here, wrap your front ribs in and hug your belly button to your spine to keep your core engaged.

The tendency is for your hip to open up so you can lift your leg higher. It isn’t so much about how high your leg goes but more so on the position of your hips. This pose is great for working your glutes as well. Hold here for a few breaths then switch legs.

One-Legged Plank

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It’s important to have a strong core if you want to invert yourself. Find plank pose. Align your shoulders over your hips and press your weight into your hands and balls of your feet. Micro-bend your elbows to further work your arm muscles and core and avoid hyper-extending through your elbow joints. Form one line of energy from your heels all the way to the top of your head. Broaden through your chest and stay strong. When you feel stable in your plank, you can work on lifting one leg up. Keep your hips stable and squared to your mat and only lift your leg as high as hip height. Hold one side for three to five breaths and then switch.

Chaturanga

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Chaturanga is a foundational pose and is the key to unlocking most, if not all, yoga arm balances.?When I started yoga, I remember it took me a few months to be able to bend my elbows back and keep them by my sides (I’m still working on my alignment in this pose too 🙂 ).

Starting from high plank, inhale as you hinge your body forward onto your tippy toes. Keep your core strong and exhale as you lower halfway down by bending your elbows back. Keep your shoulder heads pulled back away from your ears. Avoid lowering down more than halfway as this will put a lot of pressure on your shoulders. Lengthen your tailbone back and keep your glutes in line with the rest of your body. If you feel too much pressure on your shoulders, lower your knees down and you will still get the strength benefits of the pose!

Forearm Plank Pose

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Forearm plank is one of my favorite static hold poses because it gets so much done! You can interlace your fingers or have them flat in a number “11” position. Stack your elbows right underneath your shoulders and keep them only shoulder width distance apart. A quick check is to cross your arms and capture your biceps with your hands– this will tell you how wide your base should be.

Use the same tips as plank from above. In this pose, press down through your forearms and work on hugging your shoulder blades together down your back. This will keep your upper body from sinking. Take deep breaths as you hold. Challenge yourself with this pose. Start out by holding your forearm plank for 30 seconds. Then keep upping your time as you go!

Hey, you never know when you’re going to be challenged to a plank contest. 😉 A few years ago, when I worked as an auditor at the Big Four, they flew us out to the East Coast for training.?My training room had people from investment management, banking, and insurance. They asked me to represent investment management in a plank competition as part of our team building activity. The last person standing err planking was a guy who held it for seven minutes! You know I held my own though!

Dolphin Pose and Dolphin Push-ups

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From your forearm plank, walk your feet in and find downward facing dog with your lower body. Lift your hips as high as you can and wrap your front ribs in. This is dolphin pose. As you gain flexibility in your hamstrings, you’ll be able to bring your feet closer and closer to your arms. You can hold dolphin for 3 to 5 breaths or more. From here, you can also practice dolphin push-ups.

Start from dolphin pose then exhale as you shift your body over to plank with your shoulders aligned over your elbows, then inhale as you lift your hips high for dolphin. Try 10 reps then rest in child’s pose.

Supported Headstand Pose

Headstand Base: Measuring the Crown of your Head

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The crown of your head is the foundation for any headstand. You can find the safest part of your head to balance on by placing your palm on your forehead. Where your middle finger meets the top of your head is the crown of your head. When you try headstand, place the crown of your head gently on the mat.

Headstand Layer 1: Leg Lifts

 

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Interlace your fingers and open your palms up. Rest your forearms on the mat at shoulder width distance. Place the crown of your head on the mat right in front of your open palms. Your palms should be supporting the back of your head. Supported headstand is great because most of the weight will actually be on your forearms (which is why shoulder strength is key).

Once you have the top part of your headstand set up, walk your feet as close in as you can. The higher your hips are, the easier it will be to get into the pose. Start by practicing lifting one leg up at a time while keeping your hips as square as you can. (When you open up your hip, it throws off your center and balance.)

It’s important to use your core and shoulder strength during your leg lifts. It’s best to avoid kicking up into handstand or using momentum because it can cause injury.

When you lift up one leg, try coming onto your tippy toes on your base leg. This will elevate your hips further.

Headstand Layer 2: Practice Pike

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pike-up

I personally think piking up is the safest way to enter into headstand. So once you feel like you are solid with your leg lifts, you can practice piking up!?There’s a low risk of toppling over?because one leg is close to the ground and can catch yourself if you tip over.

The key is pressing your weight through your forearms, activating your shoulders, and engaging your core. Most of your weight should be on your arms. ?

Start by lifting one leg up in space. Keep your hips as square as you can and walk your toes in as close to your torso as possible so you can get your hips above your shoulders. From here, use your glutes to keep lifting your raised leg as high as it can go. When you lift your top leg as high as you can while keeping your hips stable, your bottom leg will start to follow and lift up as well, as you can see in the series of photos above.

Keep breathing through this pose and try it on both sides! Stay persistent. Just remember, yoga is a practice.

Full Supported Headstand

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You can also bend your knee on your way up! Find what works best with your body. After you are done playing with headstand, rest in embryo pose (which is child’s pose with your knees together and arms by your sides) for three to five breaths.

headstand

Here is a video showing you one way to get in and out of supported headstand. Go layer by layer, take it slow, and be brave! For more advanced variations, you can pike both legs up at the same time and add in fun poses using your legs (eagle, lotus, splits). I am so excited for the headstand breakthrough you will achieve! Please share with me your experience or feedback by?leaving a comment below.

??Bianca

How To Get into Splits Pose

Yoga with Bianca |?Splits Pose

The splits is one of my favorite poses! While I practiced this pose years ago in ballet, I lost a lot of that flexibility as the years went by. When I first attempted it again as an adult, my hips were more than a foot above the ground. With intentional stretching?over a period of a few months, I was able to eventually rest my hips on the ground. In this post, I will show you how to get into splits pose with photos and a video.

Just to preface this tutorial, everyone’s body structure is different. Our muscles, joints, and bones are built differently and any injuries will also change the dynamic. Everyone’s splits will look different, but take this tutorial as a foundation.

So let’s get started!

With any yoga pose you are attempting, you can use the following template to break down the pose:

Breaking Down Splits Pose- SOUL

S-?Strengthen

Core

O-?Open

Hips: Outer hips and hip flexors

U-?Understand Muscle Action

Extension of hamstring muscles and core stabilization?to hold you upright

L- Lengthen

Hamstrings and quads

(Source of acronym:?Corepower Yoga?Level II Teacher Training)

Build-up Poses

Forward Fold

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Start with your knees shoulder width distance apart or wider.?Bend your knees and let your chest rest over your thighs.?Allow your head to hang heavy and feel the release of tension from your neck and shoulders.?After a few deep breaths in and out through your nose, work on straightening your legs.?It’s totally fine if your fingertips don’t touch the ground, your hamstrings will open up over repeated practice.?For the fullest expression of this pose, place your palms flat on the mat with your fingertips in line with your toes.?Hold the pose for 3 to 10 breaths depending on how much time you have.

Downward Facing Dog

This one deserves a whole post on its own so I’ll break down down dog (had to ;p) in the future but this is a great pose to lengthen your calves, hamstrings, and spine.?You can take organic movements in this pose by “walking” out your dog by bending one knee and the other, nodding your head “yes” and “no”, or taking shoulder dips. Bend your knees slightly to find more length in your spine. Keep your core engaged, palms flat on the mat, shoulders away from ears. Stay here for three to ten breaths.

?Crescent Moon

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This is one of my favorite poses and I try to incorporate it in each class I teach. Our hip flexors get shortened everyday because most of us sit all day. Align your hips over your back knee. If you have sensitive knees, you can rest your knee on a block or double roll your mat. Position your front knee at a 45 degree angle so your knee stacks over your ankle to protect your knee joint. Lengthen your spine and keep your core and glutes engaged to feel this pose even more. Hold for 3 to 5 breaths and make sure you do both sides to balance out your body.

Half Splits

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From crescent moon, slide your front heel up as far as it takes to straighten your front leg. Keep your hips aligned above your back knee. Flex your front toes towards your face and work on squaring your hips to the front of your space. Feel free to keep a slight bend in your front knee or use blocks underneath each palm to bring the ground closer to you. With every inhale, lift your spine to a half-lift like the second photo and with every exhale fold deeper into your front leg. Keep moving through this flow as many breaths as you have time for to create space in your hamstrings.

Pyramid Pose

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This pose is so grounding. Start from Warrior I then straighten your front leg. Lengthen your torso towards the front while keeping?your hips squared then fold over your front leg. Continue to ground your back heel down to your mat to lengthen your calves and hamstrings. Repeat the inhale half-lift, exhale-fold flow similar to half splits above.

Standing Splits

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You’ll find that you can invert most?yoga poses and keep the same shape. Standing splits is basically splits but just on your feet! Square your hips to the ground when you lift your top leg up. Point your lifted toes to the mat and press your heel up in space. Picture the inseam of your lifted leg spiraling up to the ceiling. Take a microbend in your standing leg to protect your knee joint. It doesn’t matter how high your leg goes here, you will still experience the benefits of the pose with proper alignment! To make this pose more challenging, walk your fingertips closer to your standing leg or add a balance challenge by holding onto your shins. To ease the pose, use blocks underneath your hands or lower your lifted leg.

Half Pigeon

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This by far was one of the most uncomfortable poses for me when I first started doing yoga. Start in a three-legged downward facing dog. Take your right knee towards your right wrist and right toes toward your left wrist. Try to work your shin as parallel to the top of you mat as you can while still keeping your back kneecap on the mat. This alignment will take time and practice. You may find that your shin is angled at a 45 degree angle at first.

Check that your?back foot is angled straight and the tops of your toes press on the mat. Balance your weight equally on both hips. Take deep inhales to send your breath into the tight spaces around your hip. You can stay upright in this pose or come onto your forearms or chest. Hold for 5 to 10 breaths. Your release is three legged down dog and I like to take knee circles to further open up the hip joint.

Splits

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Now you’re ready and warmed up to try full splits! I recommend having two blocks within reach when you try this for the first time. Start in half splits (see above) then slide your heel forward until your front leg straightens as much as it can. Point your front kneecap towards the ceiling. Then, slowly slide your back knee in space until you have reached your maximum stretch. Continue to square your hips forward. A test to see if you are doing this right is your back kneecap and back thigh will be facing or resting?onto the mat.

If you have two blocks, place your blocks on either side of your hips and rest your palms on top of each block. Use your tricep and core strength to keep your body lifted against gravity. Work on breathing calmly in this pose. Hold here for 3 to 5 breaths. If there is only a block height of space from yourself and the mat, you can sit on a block and work on steady breaths in and out. This pose will take practice so give yourself a lot of grace! To get out of the pose, press your hands into the mat and?use your core strength to slowly lift your hips off the ground or the block. Be gentle with yourself. As a counter stretch, bring both legs in front of you for seated forward fold and stay for a few breaths.

Bringing it all Together- Yoga Flow

Now let’s see all these poses in action! Remember to breathe and have fun with it! Hope you enjoyed this tutorial and please feel free to comment below with feedback, questions or requests.

??Bianca

 

First Things: My Story and Blog Intention

Someone once said, ?the journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.? You and I have taken thousands of steps in our lives. Each step has shaped us into the people we are today. Today is where your story and mine intersect.?So cheers to us and to the birthday of my blog! In this post, I will be sharing my story and the intention of this blog.

My Story

6

I danced ballet for six?years growing up. Ballet was my first passion. I remember looking forward to each practice at Academy One Music and Dance Center in Manila. Through ballet, my body?became flexible and strong.?As a little girl, I learned discipline, control, and grace.?

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Once a year, we would have a recital at the Cultural Center of the Philippines. One specific year, the recital theme was Little Mermaid. They cast one of my favorite ?majors? as Ariel. Majors were the ballerinas on pointe. I was one year away from graduating to pointe and I was incredibly inspired. I wanted the opportunity to dance on pointe and audition for a leading role in our annual recital. I still remember the day my mom and I purchased my pointe shoes. I used my pointe shoes for a few months until I got news that my family was moving to the United States.

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I moved to California in August of 2001. This move was a major life change and it took me some time to adjust to my new home. The great thing was that English was my primary language growing up.?I didn?t pursue ballet in California. I don’t know what happened. Maybe it?was because I got?so close to fulfilling one of my dreams and then I felt?like I had to start over at?square one.

I was physically inactive my first few years here. I started 7th grade in 2002. In 7th grade, I got the first and last C?I would ever receive on a report card. I received a C in P.E. We were required to run a mile on the track every week and I remember being one of the last people to finish each time. I think my P.E. teacher gave me a C because he thought I wasn’t trying. I looked thin and reasonably fit from the outside. I wasn’t though. My cardiovascular endurance was slim to none.

23

I moved through high school and college remaining thin but being physically weak. I remember taking naps a lot during college because I?d be really tired all the time. I would also catch a cold practically each time I would stay up late. This continued on for some time even after I graduated college.

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At 23, I found myself at a great firm working diligently to advance my career. One of my coworkers at this firm was really athletic. She did it all! She invited me to check out a Sculpt class at CorePower Yoga, which is a heated vinyasa yoga class with weights. I had no clue what I was getting into but I was so excited. I?m not going to lie. I spent most of the class on my mat watching these superstars in class. One, because I felt like I was literally going to black out at any moment, and two, because I was so incredibly inspired at the strength and balance everyone showed in class. I did a free week at the studio in 2012 and was hooked.

2014

Since 2012, my fitness journey has been an sweet adventure. My passion is yoga. When I first started,?I practiced yoga three to four times per week. I took things at my own pace and began to challenge myself over time with more advanced classes and poses. Yoga cultivated my physical strength but the mental, emotional, and spiritual benefits of yoga kept me coming back to my mat. Late in 2013, a yoga instructor approached me about teacher training. After some contemplation, I embarked on my teaching journey summer of 2014.

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Through teaching yoga, I experienced growth in my physical yoga practice but most importantly, I found my voice. I overcame my fear of public speaking or being in front of people through teaching yoga.

6

Yoga was the key to unlocking my fitness lifestyle. During the fall of 2013, I completed my first half marathon in San Francisco. This would have made my middle school P.E. teacher proud!

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In addition to yoga and running, I took barre classes at various studios in Orange County. In early 2015, I discovered Bikini Body Guide (BBG) by Kayla Itsines and ran with it; so much so that #bbgmeetupOC was born. As of today, I do something active and sweaty six days a week. Fitness is a nonnegotiable part of my day- a meeting I schedule with myself. I?ve discovered my best body and mind through everything you?ve read so far. This brings me to this blog and my desire to share with you what I?m learning.

Blog Intention:

Inspire | Share | Connect

I live my life in an intentional way. In line with that,?I am setting an intention for this blog. The three words that stood out to me right away were: Inspire, Share, and Connect.

Inspire

One day, I woke up and?realized life wasn’t meant to be lived on the sidelines. Your life is a story. You play a major role in it. You have the unique opportunity to live out your story every day. (More on that here). When I realized that I had a choice in every single moment, my mentality shifted. I didn’t want to be defined by my past, negative thought patterns, or the?opinion of others. I grounded myself in my faith and I’m currently on an imperfect but beautiful journey?to live a life?aligned with my values.

Share

I want this blog to be a resource for you in all things yoga, fitness, and life!

Connect

I hope to make this a space where we can be real. I value relationships and connecting with people.?

Thank you for being here. I am so excited to see where this journey will take us. Drop a line and say hi below. You can stay connected on new blog posts by subscribing to the right.

??Bianca